Friday, April 6, 2012

HE DIED FOR US... AND ROSE FROM THE DEAD
(An Existential Metaphysical Message from Dr Strange)

GOOD FRIDAY to EASTER SUNDAY...

...the series of days that Christians the world over celebrate the resurrection of Christ, after his crucifixion and death at the hands of the Roman Empire.

And while not everyone is of Christian faith, EVERYONE here can be united in their belief in and discipleship of the Master of the Mystic Arts; the Sorcerer Supreme... DOCTOR STRANGE!

While not meaning to spout blasphemy or be heretical in any way, even Doctor Strange can be seen as a (fictional) messiah of sorts...

For the sake of saving the world, he undertook the role of Master Mystic, and through the ascension of his "father-figure" he became the Sorcerer Supreme.

Then to save us all (well... really he was pretty much trying to save his own life and that of his disciple/lover; Clea... but I'm sure we were on his mind), he accepted the inevitability of death itself as an option in all things, and then... died.


However, death is not the end, but merely a transitional phase of existence - a part of the cycle of life.
In this way, combined with mystical pathways, Dr. Strange was then able to transcend death - and be reborn - resurrected!

 "Died - and Risen!"
Doctor Strange transcends death BY DYING...
Doctor Strange; Master of the Mystic Arts # 4 Englehart and Brunner

Certainly, while we may not be able to rise from the grave after we shuffle off this mortal coil, we can take heart in the message given to us by Christianity, Jewish eschatology or Chan / Zen Buddhism... or that of Doctor Strange... that Death is not the end... but only a New Beginning!

2 comments:

Dex1138 said...

I have no problem worshiping this messiah!

Anonymous said...

I find it interesting that Dr Strange has canonically erased all lingering fears over his death, but according to Fraction in Defenders #1, he is "afraid of dying alone".

It may be the case that the Ancient One's trial has merely served to help the good doctor overcome all fears over the actual moment of death itself, rather than the "lesser" fears of all of the circumstances surrounding ones death, yet I feel this explanation somewhat detracts from the poignancy of this great step on Stephen's path to mastering the mystic arts.

Come to think of it, you may well have touched upon this topic in your review of that issue of Defenders. If so, please ignore my ramblings and keep up the good work.

Post a Comment